Posts Tagged "Business case"

Stock Exchanges Address Boardroom Diversity

July 2015. Tara Giunta and Michelle Cline of  Paul Hastings LLP explore the role of stock exchanges in promoting gender diversity on corporate boards. The article from Ethical Boardroom reviews the varying stages of progress in Australia and New Zealand, Europe, and North America regarding diversity-related provisions in listing requirements. Although few ...

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Australia: Super Funds Take on ASX 200 Boards with No Women

July 2015. The Australian Council of Superannuation Investors, representing non-profit super funds who manage $400 billion, has threatened not to re-elect company directors who are perpetuating a "boys' club". The institutional investors are releasing a list of the 32 companies in the ASX 200 that have no women directors with the goal of increasing ...

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Public Pension Funds Ask SEC for Boardroom Diversity Disclosure

March 2015. Officials representing public pension funds from nine states have signed a letter to the Securities and Exchange Commission requesting the organization to update its board nominee disclosure rules. The representatives of California, North Carolina, Ohio, Illinois, New York and Connecticut, representing $1.12 trillion in investment assets, called for ...

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Canada: Government Promotes Increased Representation of Women on Corporate Boards

Canada's Minister of Labour and Minister of Status of Women the Honorable Dr. K. Kellie Leitch spoke about the importance of increasing women's representation on corporate boards.  The Minister presented evidence to demonstrate how increasing the number of women directors can enhance corporate performance, noting also that while women represent ...

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Credit Suisse Research Report validates business case for women on boards

7/31/12 - Credit Suisse Research Institute released a report which found that over the course of the past six years, companies with at least one woman on the board have outperformed in terms of share price performance those with no women on the board.  Companies with at least one woman ...

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CED report, Fulfilling the Promise: How More Women on Corporate Boards Would Make America and American Companies More Competitive

June 25, 2012:  The Committee for Economic Development (CED) issued a major report that underscores the global competitive business case for electing more women to corporate boards and for developing the talents of female emerging corporate leaders.  If American companies fail to meet the career requirements of high-performing women, they ...

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Ottawa: Good news for women (and our economy) in budget’s fine print

Ottawa, Canada:  Canadian HR Reporter comments that the recently submitted Canadian federal budget includes a line item funding an “advisory council of leaders from the private and public sectors to promote the participation of women on corporate boards.” "The budget document went on to point out “Canadian women have high levels ...

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Fast Company: Investing in women and not just in the abstract

"Companies with more women on boards and in leadership positions outperform, financially and otherwise, companies with fewer women--and yet, this information doesn't typically factor into investment decisions. Now, some firms are giving investors the option to invest in companies that promote gender equality." Knowing that companies with gender diversity perform best, you’d ...

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Women on boards and its rationale

Interesting blog by Nick Lindsay. He argues that the business case  justification which many put forward for increasing the gender diversity of boards --  that companies with greater board gender diversity perform better financially generally than those that lack gender diversity -- could be hindering, and not helping, to increase ...

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FT: The groundswell feels irreversible

The Financial Times reports that while the percentage of female FTSE 100 board directors has risen from 12.5% to 15% over the past twelve months since the Davies Report was issued, the prevailing view is that UK's largest companies may not meet the Davies' recommendation of 25% by 2015.  The ...

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